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Creation Stories:
Free conversations about creativity


 

The process of wrestling with a story teaches you how to wrangle your
own creativity. It teaches you more than how to write, it teaches you
what’s possible.


​The Australian Writers Mentoring Program hosts occasional free online
conversations with acclaimed writers, focusing on the problems they
encountered writing their first and sophomore books, and how they solved
them.


These sessions focus on craft skills, creative problem and creative self-
management.  If you’re interested in creativity (or reading!) these short
conversations are inspirational.


And there’s a giveaway for one ticket holder at each event.


The conversations are free, online and short (half an hour). If the time
doesn’t work for you (or if you miss the live session), the session will be
recorded for you to access after the event.


Our next conversation is on September 25th , when acclaimed author and
director of the Australian Writers Mentoring Program Dr Kathryn Heyman
will be in conversation with Pip Williams - author of the New York Times
bestseller,
The Dictionary of Lost Words.

Pip Williams.jpg

Creation Story with Pip Williams


Date: Monday 25th September 2023


Time: 10.00am Sydney time AEST


Can’t make that time?

Don’t worry – all registered ticket holders will receive a link to the recording.

Pip Williams


Pip Williams was born in London, grew up in Sydney and now calls the Adelaide Hills home. She is the author of the international number one bestseller, The Dictionary of Lost Words, described by The Times as 'an extraordinary, charming novel'. It was also a New York Times bestseller, a Reese Witherspoon Book Club pick and has been translated into over thirty languages to worldwide acclaim.

Pip's second novel, The Bookbinder of Jericho, sprang from her discovery of archival footage of women who worked in the bindery of Oxford University Press during the early twentieth century. When she tried to find out more about them, there was almost nothing. Despite their important role in the production of books, barely a word has been written about them until now.

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